Even the World Health Organization Sees the Benefit of Medical Cannabis

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Legal reform for both recreational and medical cannabis are international issues. While we often focus on domestic issues here at Ladybud, we also track developing progress in other countries. Few organizations are as perfectly poised as the United Nations to drastically change the way that the international community handles cannabis.

For decades, the United States and its backward and ridiculous prohibition on cannabis have impacted international policy. The United States effectively strong-armed other countries in to compliance with cannabis prohibition. Now, international authorities are speaking out about the potential benefits of medical cannabis and the importance of legal reform.

The World Health Organization (WHO), which is the medical branch of the United Nations, has officially announced its support of medical cannabis reform.

The WHO wants whole-plant cannabis and cannabis extracts removed from Schedule IV, which is the highest category listed in a critical 1961 international drug convention/treaty. Additionally, the WHO advocates for the complete removal of THC from a second treaty executed two decades later. In a move that will no doubt excite CBD enthusiasts, the WHO also stated that they do not believe that CBD with less than .2% THC warrants any level of international control or regulation at all.

This exciting recommendation could have profound implications for international cannabis law reform. More countries may feel empowered to change their current policies knowing that they won’t be in direct violation of UN treaties. Hopefully, the current federal administration will take notice of the UN’s shifting stance on cannabis prohibition and start some federal level reforms here in the United States. The evidence of the medical benefits of cannabis, combined with incontrovertible proof of the harms of prohibition, are finally affecting those who make decisions at the highest levels.

This exciting recommendation could have profound implications for international cannabis law reform. More countries may feel empowered to change their current policies knowing that they won’t be in direct violation of UN treaties. Hopefully, the current federal administration will take notice of the UN’s shifting stance on cannabis prohibition and start some federal level reforms here in the United States. The evidence of the medical benefits of cannabis, combined with incontrovertible proof of the harms of prohibition, are finally affecting those who make decisions at the highest levels.

For previous Ladybud articles about international cannabis reform, click here.

Photo Credit: Sanjitbakshi via Flickr under CC BY 2.0