Are Marijuana Medibles The New Date Rape Drug? Not Likely

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Prohibitionists in Florida are getting really desperate.  The Vote No on 2 campaign clearly knows that it’s fighting an uphill battle: 88% of people in Florida reportedly support medical marijuana legalization in the state, according to a poll released last month.

They’ve tried all the standard fear tactics already. “Think of the children” has clearly failed to sway the public, despite their best attempts to the contrary. “But drug dealers aren’t really humans,” the tactic on their front page currently, doesn’t seem to be working well either. So now they’re apparently trying to convince people that cannabis infused food products, also called medibles or edibles, will be a tool for date rape.

That’s right. Now the people fighting against medical marijuana are claiming that medibles will be used for date rape. There are so many things wrong with this idea it’s hard to know where to begin.

First of all, there’s the simple fact that medibles or orally consumed cannabis will take quite some time to come to full effect. Many a newbie has learned the hard way that it can often take two hours for the cannabis-infused food products to really start working. Unlike common date rape drugs, of which alcohol is the most prevalent, followed by sedatives (often mixed in alcohol), medibles generally will not kick in quickly.

There is also little hope for the predator that the effects of the drugging will not be noticed by the victim. Unlike Flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), there is no synergistic effect with alcohol, allowing one substance to mask the effects of the other. Someone who has been overdosed on cannabis will figure it out if they have experience with cannabis  and those who aren’t familiar with cannabis will likely think they’re having serious medical issues when the cannabis starts affecting them.

They will likely suffer from paranoia and anxiety, particularly if they were dosed without their prior knowledge and consent, so chances are slim they’ll be easy prey. Although high doses of cannabis do lend themselves to passing out for a night of blissful rest, it won’t be the incoherent stupor alcohol brings, unless there’s a very large, ridiculous dose being administered. Any sleepiness will be preceded by other effects of the plant, and when it kicks in, the person who was dosed will  likely still be able to wake up with minimal effort if they are being touched or undressed.

Additionally, cannabis and cannabis-infused foods have been available on the black market for some time, alongside the more commonly used date rape drugs. Alcohol’s position isn’t under threat; it will remain the simplest way for an attacker to quickly and quietly incapacitate their intended victims. Cannabis isn’t really good at knocking people out, masking other drugs, or inducing people to behave in ways they typically wouldn’t.

This whole argument rings hollow anyway. It’s not as though any of us believed that prohibitionists care at all about sexual assault/abuse survivors. If they did, they wouldn’t be actively blocking the only safe, natural medical option for controlling the symptoms of PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) so often experienced by survivors.

It’s time to rethink your strategy, No on 2. Your propaganda is bad, and you should feel bad.

 

Photo Credit: No on 2 Facebook page